Hip Pain, Iliopsoas Muscle Pain and Iliopsoas Injury

Fix hip and iliopsoas muscle pain caused by iliopsoas tendinitis and iliopsoas syndrome.

by Brad Walker | First Published December 6, 2005 | Updated May 24, 2017

Iliopsoas Tendinitis and Hip PainHip Pain and Iliopsoas Muscle Pain caused by iliopsoas tendinitis and iliopsoas syndrome are conditions that affect the iliopsoas muscle located in the anterior region (or front) of the hip.

(Due to the over-whelming response I received from last month’s article, Piriformis Syndrome, I’ve decided to stick with conditions that affect the hip area. Apparently, there are a lot of people suffering with hip pain.)

If you suffer from hip pain or are seeking to prevent its occurrence it is important to follow the information in this article. In addition, adding a few simple stretches to your fitness program will also help. To get started on a safe and effective stretching routine that’s just right for you, check out the Ultimate Guide to Stretching & Flexibility.

What is Iliopsoas Tendinitis (or Iliopsoas Syndrome)?

Technically, they are two separate conditions, but it’s not uncommon to hear the term iliopsoas tendinitis or iliopsoas syndrome being used to describe the same thing.

Iliopsoas tendinitis refers to inflammation of the iliopsoas muscle and can also affect the bursa located underneath the tendon of the iliopsoas muscle. Whereas iliopsoas syndrome refers to a stretch, tear or complete rupture of the iliopsoas muscle and / or tendon.

Anatomy of the Hip Joint

Iliopsoas Muscle picture used from Principles of Anatomy and PhysiologyThe iliopsoas muscle is actually made up of two separate muscles located in the anterior (or front) of the hip area.

In the diagram to the right you can see the Iliacus labeled on the left and the Psoas labeled on the right. These two muscles are responsible for lifting the upper leg to the torso, or flexing the torso towards the thigh (as in a sit-up).

Although the two muscles start at different points (the psoas originates from the spine, while the iliacus originates from the hip bone) they both end up at the same point; the upper portion of the thigh bone. It is at this point; the insertion, that most injury occurs.

What Causes Iliopsoas Tendinitis and Iliopsoas Syndrome?

Iliopsoas tendinitis is predominately caused by repetitive hip flexion or overuse of the hip area, resulting in inflammation. Iliopsoas syndrome, on the other hand, is caused by a sudden contraction of the iliopsoas muscle, which results in a rupture or tear of the muscle, usually at the point where the muscle and tendon connect.

Athletes at risk include runners, jumpers and participants of sports that require a lot of kicking. Also at risk are those who participate in strength training and weight lifting exercises that require a lot of bending and squatting.

Symptom of Iliopsoas Tendinitis

Pain and tenderness are common symptoms of both conditions; however the onset of pain associated with iliopsoas tendinitis is gradual and tends to build up over an extended period of time, whereas the pain associated with iliopsoas syndrome is sudden and very sharp.

Hip Pain Treatment

Iliopsoas tendinitis and iliopsoas syndrome is a soft tissue injury of the iliopsoas muscle and therefore should be treated like any other soft tissue injury. Immediately following an injury, or at the onset of pain, the R.I.C.E.R. regimen should be employed. This involves Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation, and Referral to an appropriate professional for an accurate diagnosis.

It is critical that the R.I.C.E.R. regimen be implemented for at least the first 48 to 72 hours. Doing this will give you the best possible chance of a complete and full recovery.

The next phase of treatment (after the first 48 to 72 hours) involves a number of physiotherapy techniques. The application of heat and massage is one of the most effective treatments for removing scar tissue and speeding up the healing process of the muscles and tendons.

Once most of the pain has been reduced, it is time to move onto the rehabilitation phase of your treatment. The main aim of this phase is to regain the strength, power, endurance and flexibility of the muscles and tendons that have been injured.

Hip Pain Prevention

There are a number of preventative techniques that will help to prevent both iliopsoas tendinitis and iliopsoas syndrome, including modifying equipment or sitting positions, taking extended rests and even learning new routines for repetitive activities. However, there are four preventative measures that I feel are far more important and effective.

Firstly, a thorough and correct warm up will help to prepare the muscles and tendons for any activity to come. Without a proper warm up the muscles and tendons will be tight and stiff. There will be limited blood flow to the hip area, which will result in a lack of oxygen and nutrients for the muscles. This is a sure-fire recipe for a muscle or tendon injury.

Before any activity be sure to thoroughly warm up all the muscles and tendons that will be used during your sport or activity. Click here for a detailed explanation of how, why and when to perform your warm up.

Secondly, rest and recovery are extremely important; especially for athletes or individuals whose lifestyle involves strenuous physical activity. Be sure to let your muscles rest and recover after heavy physical activity.

Thirdly, strengthening and conditioning the muscles of the hips, buttocks and lower back will also help to prevent iliopsoas tendinitis and iliopsoas syndrome.

And fourthly, (and most importantly) flexible muscles and tendons are extremely important in the prevention of most strain or sprain injuries. When muscles and tendons are flexible and supple, they are able to move and perform without being over stretched. If however, your muscles and tendons are tight and stiff, it is quite easy for those muscles and tendons to be pushed beyond their natural range of movement. When this happens, strains, sprains, and pulled muscles occur.

To keep your muscles and tendons flexible and supple, it is important to undertake a structured stretching routine and to get you started I’ve included an effective iliopsoas stretch below.

Iliopsoas Muscle Stretch

How to perform this stretch: Kneel on one foot and the other knee. If needed, hold on to something to keep your balance and then gently push your hips forward.

How long to hold this stretch: Hold this position for between 20 to 30 seconds while concentrating on breathing deeply and slowly. Carefully move out of the stretch position and then repeat on the other side. Repeat 2 to 3 times on each side.

The Stretching Handbook, DVD & CD-ROMWhile the recommendations on this page are a good starting point, you'll get a lot more benefit when you include a wider variety of stretches.

To do away with stiff, tight muscles and joints, and become loose, limber and pain free, grab a copy of the Ultimate Guide to Stretching & Flexibility. In no time you'll...

  • Improve your freedom of movement and full-body mobility;
  • Get rid of those annoying aches, pains and injuries; and
  • Take your flexibility (and ease of movement) to the next level.

If you’d like to be able to bend, reach and turn without restriction or discomfort, all the stretches you need are right here.

You'll get 135 clear photographs and 44 video demonstrations of unique stretching exercises for every major muscle group in your body. The DVD includes 3 customized stretching routines (8 minutes each) for the Upper Body; the Lower Body; and the Neck, Back & Core. While the Handbook will show you, step-by-step, how to perform each stretch correctly and safely.

Get back to the activities you love. Whether it’s enjoying your favorite sport, or walking the dog, or playing with the grand kids. Imagine getting out of bed in the morning with a spring in your step. Or being able to work in the garden without “paying-for-it” the next day.

A whole new level of comfort and freedom is waiting for you. Click here to discover how to improve your flexibility and fitness, and become loose, limber and pain free!


Brad Walker - AKA The Stretch CoachAbout the Author: Brad is often referred to as the "Stretch Coach" and has even been called the Stretching Guru. Magazines such as Runners World, Bicycling, Triathlete, Swimming & Fitness, and Triathlon Sports have all featured his work. Amazon has listed his books on five Best-Seller lists. Google cites over 100,000 references to him and his work on the internet. And satisfied customers from 122 countries have sent 100's of testimonials. If you want to know about stretching, flexibility or sports injury management, Brad Walker is the go-to-guy.